Contributing Editors

Jerome Lyle Rappaport

Jerome Lyle Rappaport
Founder and Board Member
Read Bio

Edward Glaeser

Edward Glaeser
Professor of Economics at Harvard University
Read Bio

Stephen P. Johnson

Stephen P. Johnson
Executive Director of Phyllis and Jerome Lyle Rappaport Foundation
Read Bio

Greg Massing

Greg Massing
Executive Director for the Rappaport Center for Law and Public Service
Read Bio

Alasdair Roberts

Alasdair Roberts
Professor of Law and Public Policy at Suffolk University Law School
Read Bio

Joseph Curtatone

Joseph Curtatone
Mayor, City of Somerville
Read Bio

Tim H. Davis

Tim H. Davis
Independent Research Consultant
Read Bio

Scott Harshbarger

Scott Harshbarger
Senior Counsel, Proskauer Rose LLP
Read Bio

Vivien Li

Vivien Li
Executive Director of The Boston Harbor Association
Read Bio

Guest contributors

Monika Bandyopadhyay
Suffolk University Law Student

David Barron
Harvard Law School and former Deputy Counsel for the Office of Legal Counsel in the US Department of Justice

Linda Bilmes
Senior lecturer in public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. Assistant Secretary of Commerce during the Clinton Administration.

Brandy H.M. Brooks
Director, Rudy Bruner Award for Urban Excellence, Bruner Foundation

Felicia Cote
Rappaport Fellow, Harvard Law School/Harvard Kennedy School.

Amanda Eden
Suffolk University Law School student

Sara Farnum
Student, Suffolk Univ. Law School

Kristin Faucette
Student at Suffolk University Law School

Benjamin Forman
Research Director, MassINC

Arthur Hardy-Doubleday
JD/MBA student at Suffolk University Law School and the Sawyer School of Business

Theodore Kalivas
Boston Green Blog, Dukakis Center for Urban & Regional Policy

David Linhart
Student, Boston University School of Law

Antoniya Owens
Research Analyst, Mathematica Policy Research, Inc.

Susan Prosnitz
Senior Advisor, TSA, Washington, DC

Ben Thomas
Boston Green Blog, Dukakis Center for Urban & Regional Policy

Matthew Todaro
Student at Boston College Law School

Alexander von Hoffman
Senior Researcher, Joint Center for Housing Studies

Brett Walker
Student, Boston College Law School

Margarita Warren
Student at Suffolk University Law School

Despite Long Term, High Unemployment, Gateway Cities Out-Performed State on Jobs during Recession

Tuesday, July 26th, 2011
By Tim H. Davis

High unemployment persists in the Gateway Cities, and these cities are worse off today compared to the state today than they were before the recession. Although you might expect that this deterioration is due to a greater loss of jobs that other parts of the state, this is not the case. The Gateway Cities actually have outperformed the remainder of the state on employment during the recession. While unemployment has declined in the rest of the state due to a decline the labor force, the labor force has grown in the Gateway Cities, highlighting the importance of these cities to the regeneration of Massachusetts’ total labor force.

Unemployment Is Higher in Gateway Cities

Employment in Massachusetts peaked in July 2008. At that time, unemployment was higher in the Gateway Cities (7.0 percent) than in Boston (5.6 percent) or Massachusetts as a whole (5.4 percent). In cities and towns outside Boston and the Gateway Cities, unemployment was 4.9 percent (see Chart and Table 1). The number of employed Massachusetts residents declined six percent from July 2008 to the trough in January 2010. At that time, Massachusetts unemployment stood at 9.6 percent. Unemployment was 12.1 percent in the Gateway Cities and 8.4 percent in Boston. At 8.9 percent, unemployment in cities and towns outside Boston and the Gateway Cities was now higher than Boston. From January 2010 to May 2011, the unemployment rate declined to 7.4 percent in Massachusetts and to 9.9 percent in the Gateway Cities. Before the recession, there was a 1.6 percentage point gap between the Massachusetts and Gateway Cities’ unemployment rates. This gap expanded to 2.5 percentage points by January 2010 and remained unchanged in May 2011.

For the full text of this article click here.



Comments

No comments have been added.

(required, but never shown publicly)

» Show all posts

U.S. Representative Barney Frank speaking at the Harvard Kennedy School, cosponsored by the Rappaport Institute.
Former Lt. Governor Kerry Healey speaks about political parity at the Rappaport Center
Statnet panel of current and former heads of local performance management programs including Stephanie Hirsch (far right), former head of SomerStat and Devin Lyons-Quirk, third from right.
HKS Professor Jeffrey Liebman (left) spoke about new ways to spur policy innovation at a State House briefing sponsored by State Representative (and former Rappaport Urban Scholar) Charles Murphy (right).
Triumph of the City: Ed Glaeser talks about his new book on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart
 MA Attorney General Martha Coakley Hearing on Sexual Exploitation Online
Arianna Huffington and Alan Khazei speaking at the Rappaport Center
Gov. Deval Patrick speaking at the Rappaport Center's Gubernatorial Speakers Series
Mayor Menino attends Marshall-Brennan Constitutional Literacy Course for high school students

News and Events


Add your Event

Word Cloud