Contributing Editors

Jerome Lyle Rappaport

Jerome Lyle Rappaport
Founder and Board Member
Read Bio

Edward Glaeser

Edward Glaeser
Professor of Economics at Harvard University
Read Bio

Stephen P. Johnson

Stephen P. Johnson
Executive Director of Phyllis and Jerome Lyle Rappaport Foundation
Read Bio

Greg Massing

Greg Massing
Executive Director for the Rappaport Center for Law and Public Service
Read Bio

Alasdair Roberts

Alasdair Roberts
Professor of Law and Public Policy at Suffolk University Law School
Read Bio

Joseph Curtatone

Joseph Curtatone
Mayor, City of Somerville
Read Bio

Tim H. Davis

Tim H. Davis
Independent Research Consultant
Read Bio

Scott Harshbarger

Scott Harshbarger
Senior Counsel, Proskauer Rose LLP
Read Bio

Vivien Li

Vivien Li
Executive Director of The Boston Harbor Association
Read Bio

Guest contributors

Monika Bandyopadhyay
Suffolk University Law Student

David Barron
Harvard Law School and former Deputy Counsel for the Office of Legal Counsel in the US Department of Justice

Linda Bilmes
Senior lecturer in public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. Assistant Secretary of Commerce during the Clinton Administration.

Brandy H.M. Brooks
Director, Rudy Bruner Award for Urban Excellence, Bruner Foundation

Felicia Cote
Rappaport Fellow, Harvard Law School/Harvard Kennedy School.

Amanda Eden
Suffolk University Law School student

Sara Farnum
Student, Suffolk Univ. Law School

Kristin Faucette
Student at Suffolk University Law School

Benjamin Forman
Research Director, MassINC

Arthur Hardy-Doubleday
JD/MBA student at Suffolk University Law School and the Sawyer School of Business

Theodore Kalivas
Boston Green Blog, Dukakis Center for Urban & Regional Policy

David Linhart
Student, Boston University School of Law

Antoniya Owens
Research Analyst, Mathematica Policy Research, Inc.

Susan Prosnitz
Senior Advisor, TSA, Washington, DC

Ben Thomas
Boston Green Blog, Dukakis Center for Urban & Regional Policy

Matthew Todaro
Student at Boston College Law School

Alexander von Hoffman
Senior Researcher, Joint Center for Housing Studies

Brett Walker
Student, Boston College Law School

Margarita Warren
Student at Suffolk University Law School

Articles in Planning/Zoning/Housing

Why the Commonwealth’s Affordable Housing Law, 40B, Works

Monday, September 12th, 2011
By Arthur Hardy-Doubleday

Chapter 40B is the Commonwealth’s affordable housing law. Since 1969, it has helped create affordable housing by expediting the permitting process for developers in exchange for their designation of up to 25 percent of the units developed as affordable.

This past November, the law was threatened with repeal in a referendum question on the statewide ballot.  It offered voters the chance to completely gut the law and to end the state’s ability to create new affordable housing.  While the law’s administration is not perfect, 40B has accomplished its major public policy objective of developing affordable housing. Apparently recognizing the value of the law, a substantial majority of voters in November rejected repeal of Chapter 40B.

Read More...

Boston City Council Redistricting: No Easy Task!

Monday, September 12th, 2011
By Tim H. Davis

September 7th was the last day to register to vote for Boston’s preliminary City Council elections. While much of the current focus in Massachusetts political circles has been on the redistricting of Massachusetts U.S. Congressional seats, it is also time for redistricting of state legislative and city council districts. The redistricting of Boston’s nine city council districts faces some interesting challenges. Population increases in downtown areas were offset by population declines in other neighborhoods, and given physical geography, the residences of current city councilors, and concerns about fair representation of people of color, the task of redistricting is difficult.

Read More...

Adapting Massachusetts' "Housing First" Policy for Family Homelessness

Thursday, September 8th, 2011
By David Linhart

David Linhart was a Rappaport Fellow in Law and Public Policy in 2011. He is pursuing a J.D. at Boston University School of Law. He received his B.S. and M.Eng. in Biological Engineering from Cornell University. As a Rappaport Fellow, David worked at The Community Builders, Inc., a nonprofit affordable housing developer.

The administration of Governor Deval Patrick is midway into a five-year campaign to end homelessness in Massachusetts. On July 11, 2011, Patrick signed a law intended to move families into permanent housing quickly, rather than offering temporary shelter first. No one really knows what will help families who receive assistance to stay housed for the long haul, but encouraging supportive relationships with other assisted families is certainly a step in the right direction. 

Read More...

Refinancing Mortgages Won't Fix Housing Market

Friday, September 2nd, 2011
By Edward Glaeser

Originally published in Bloomberg News

The New York Times reported last week that the Obama administration was considering a proposal to "allow millions of homeowners with government-backed mortgages to refinance them at today’s lower interest rates, about 4 percent."


The measure’s supporters tout this as an almost cost-free way to stimulate the economy, boost the housing market and reduce foreclosures. But universal refinancing is far from free, and is poorly designed to stimulate either the economy or the housing market. Certainly, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the huge finance companies now under government control, will have to allow some mortgage modifications in order to reduce their foreclosure losses. That calls for smart, selective policies, not universal refinancing.

Read More...

SCN Interview with Harvard Economist Edward Glaeser

Thursday, September 1st, 2011
By

Edward Glaeser, an economics professor at Harvard University, recently sat down with Spare Change News editor Tom Benner to discuss his myth-shattering book about cities, Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier.


Read More...

Gateway Municipalities Continue To Be Among the Hardest Hit by Foreclosures

Monday, August 15th, 2011
By Tim H. Davis

This is the second entry in an ongoing series on the 24 Massachusetts municipalities known as the “Gateway Cities.” The foreclosure crises started in the sub-prime mortgage market. Nationally, these loans were concentrated in two types of real estate markets: 1) urban neighborhoods, especially those with weak/distressed real estate markets, and 2) new neighborhoods built on speculation. A 2006 joint Pioneer Institute/Rappaport Institute report identified local zoning policy as a major constraint on new housing production, creating the conditions for the upward spiral of Massachusetts housing prices from 2000 to 2005. As a result of this lack of new production, unlike the housing booms in the sunbelt states of Arizona, Florida and Nevada (which have the highest foreclosure rates in the country), there were few neighborhoods built on speculation, limiting Massachusetts exposure to these types of foreclosures.

Read More...

From Old Factories to New Hope: Mass. gateway cities must tally up their tremendous assets — and make the most of them

Thursday, July 28th, 2011
By Edward Glaeser

Reprinted from The Boston Globe July 28, 2011


About six years ago, the City of Haverhill decided to count its blessings. After decades spent wishing for new factories to replace those that had closed in the 1970s, the city chose another direction. Like an addict struggling to turn his life around, Haverhill forced itself to tally its assets and debits honestly.

Those empty mills whose turrets soared above the deserted downtown? Since the ’70s they had been a sad symbol of lost prosperity; but their architecture pointed in another direction, as loft apartments or space for smaller, more innovative companies. Then there were train lines. Haverhill, fortunately, had two: A well-traveled MBTA service to Boston, and a stop on the then-new Amtrak “Downeaster,’’ which journeys north to Maine and south to Boston. 

Read More...

Despite Long Term, High Unemployment, Gateway Cities Out-Performed State on Jobs during Recession

Tuesday, July 26th, 2011
By Tim H. Davis

The Gateway Series will be an occasional posting on issues related to the 24 cities identified by the state at Gateway Municipalities, with a focus on the economy, housing and demographics. This is Series #1.

High unemployment persists in the Gateway Cities, and these cities are worse off today compared to the state today than they were before the recession. Although you might expect that this deterioration is due to a greater loss of jobs that other parts of the state, this is not the case. The Gateway Cities actually have outperformed the remainder of the state on employment during the recession. While unemployment has declined in the rest of the state due to a decline the labor force, the labor force has grown in the Gateway Cities, highlighting the importance of these cities to the regeneration of Massachusetts’ total labor force.

Read More...

Situation Critical: The Urgent Need for Independent Analysis, Regulation, and Oversight Before Massachusetts Legalizes Casinos

Friday, July 8th, 2011
By Scott Harshbarger

Once again, the pundits and prognosticators are saying that Massachusetts is on the verge of forever changing the Commonwealth’s cultural and economic landscape by legalizing casinos and expanded gambling.

A key legislative committee recently held a hearing on bills to vastly expand gambling – a hearing which, even at six hours, was remarkably shorter and less contentious than previous years. News reports and public comments tell us that the “Big Three” of Massachusetts government – the Governor, Speaker of the House and Senate President – are negotiating this issue, “behind closed doors” and might, in fact, emerge with a nearly completed bill presented as a fait accompli for members of the legislative branches and public to simply support or oppose.

Before this happens, it is absolutely essential that the Commonwealth establish a regulatory and enforcement regime capable of regulating, administering, and if necessary, restraining such a dramatic expansion. While Citizens for a Stronger Massachusetts (CSM) is not convinced that expanded gambling will be good for our economy or our taxpayers, we are is certain that an independent analysis of the costs and benefits should be undertaken, and appropriate regulatory controls adopted, before any expansion occurs.

Read More...

The Locavore’s Dilemma

Thursday, June 16th, 2011
By Edward Glaeser

Reprinted from The Boston Globe 6.16.11

All that is grassy is not green. There are many good reasons to like local food, but any large-scale metropolitan farming will do more harm than good to the environment. Devoting scarce metropolitan land to agriculture means lower density levels, longer drives, and carbon emission increases which easily offset the modest greenhouse gas reductions associated with shipping less food. 

Read More...

Large Turnout for First StatNet Training Day

Monday, June 13th, 2011
By

More than 120 representatives from New England municipalities, state agencies, and non-profit organizations attended the first StatNet Training Day, which was held on Wednesday, May 18th at the University of Massachusetts Boston. The training was sponsored and organized by New England StatNet, a network of municipal officials using CitiStat or other data-driven performance management approaches that is coordinated by UMass Boston’s Collins Center for Public Management in collaboration with the Rappaport Institute and the Pioneer Institute for Public Policy Research. Speakers at the training session included HKS Lecturer Robert Behn, who is a Rappaport Institute faculty affiliate; Devin Lyons-Quirk, a former Rappaport Policy Fellow who is now Senior Project Manager for Performance for the City of Boston; and Stephanie Hirsch, who supervised several Rappaport Policy Fellows and also worked closely with students from an Institute-supported class on budgeting and management that carried out several projects for the City of Somerville. Amy Dain, another former Rappaport Fellow, coordinates the StatNet initiative. For more information about New England StatNet (formerly known as MassStat) click below.

Read More...

Stuff We Find In Historic Buildings

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2011
By

What happens when an organization devoted to Historic Preservation, begins to renovate an historic building designed by H.H. Richardson that is located in what was once the heart of the Combat Zone, Boston’s “adult entertainment” district?  That’s how Historic Boston, Inc. – which is headed by Kathy Kottaridis, a member of the Rappaport Institute’s advisory board and also a former Rappaport Urban Scholar at Harvard’s Kennedy School – came to own a collection of vintage pornographic movies.  Read more at “Stuff-We-Find-in-Historic-Buildings #2: On Preservation and Pornography at the Hayden Building,” online at http://www.historicbostonblog.org/2011/04/stuff-we-find-in-historic-buildings-2.html.

Read More...

Measuring Happiness in Somerville

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2011
By

The annual city census forms distributed in Somerville this year had some unexpected queries, reported a front-page article in Sunday’s New York Times. In addition to the usual questions about occupation and age, the forms also asked residents questions like, on a scale of 1 to 10, “How happy do you feel right now?” and “In general, how similar are you to other people you know?” and “Taking everything into account, how satisfied are you with Somerville as a place to live?”

“Cities keep careful track of their finances, but a bond rating doesn’t tell us how people feel or why they want to raise a family here or relocate a business here,” explained Somerville Mayor Joseph A. Curtatone, who currently is attending the Kennedy School as a Rappaport Urban Scholar, in the article.

The article adds that the city will use the data to develop a happiness index and other data that can be analyzed as part of the city’s SomerStat performance management program, which was developed with assistance from the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston. “We want to see what the baseline data tell us and then expand,” explained Tara Acker, director of that program. “Is there a correlation between happiness and open space or green space? If we see low levels of satisfaction correlated to low levels of income, perhaps we want more programs aimed at low-income people.”

The full article is available by clicking on "read more."

Read More...

What Crisis? Inadequacies with the nation’s infrastructure have been oversold

Friday, April 8th, 2011
By Edward Glaeser

Does America suffer from an infrastructure gap that requires spending hundreds of billions of tax dollars rebuilding America? Is President Obama right that the nation needs "the fastest, most reliable ways to move people, goods, and information" to attract new businesses? Of course, battered bridges and ruined roads should be repaired, but any larger federal infrastructure agenda should be approached with caution because the crisis has been oversold, and the current political climate practically ensures massive misspending.

Read More...

Which Places are Growing?

Wednesday, April 6th, 2011
By

In a new Rappaport Institute/Taubman Center Policy Brief titled Which Places are Growing? Seven Notable Trends From Newly Released Census Data, Edward Glaeser, director of the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston, identifies seven key facts about county-level population growth that emerge from census data that were released on March 24, 2011. The seven facts are:

  • Population growth was much higher in counties with higher incomes as of 2000.
  • January temperature continues to be a strong predictor of population growth.
  • Population growth was faster near ports.
  • People are moving to dense areas, but not the densest areas.
  • The education level of a county as of 2000 strongly predicts population growth over the last decade.
  • Manufacturing employment predicts lower population growth.
  • Limits to housing supply also limit population growth.
  • Glaeser concludes by noting that while these trends do not dictate any particular public policies or suggest any particular course of action, they should be relevant for policy-makers at both the local and the national level.

The full policy brief is available here

Read More...

What Happened to the Cows on Boston Common?

Thursday, March 24th, 2011
By

Most Bostonians know that cows once grazed on Boston Common and some even know about the great celebrations that occurred on the Common in 1848, when potable drinking water began flowing through the city's new public water system. But very few of us know how Bostonians decided to rid the Common of cows or of the intense and passionate debates that preceded construction of the new water system. In Eden on the Charles: The Making of Boston, recently published by Harvard University Press, historian Michael Rawson, offers rich accounts of five key decisions: turning Boston Common into a park, providing potable drinking water, creating independent suburbs, regulating uses of Boston Harbor, and creating suburban parks.

Read More...

Solar Boston and Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE)

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2011
By Ben Thomas

The Solar Boston initiative continues to outshine many other solar programs around the country. In addition to the Solar Boston Interactive GIS Maps, Boston has also adopted measures to facilitate the completion of solar projects. Last fall, the Boston City Council approved Mayor Menino's solar permitting guidelines, which reduced solar project permitting fees up to 60%. In addition, Boston has created the Solar Permitting Guide to streamline the permit process and educate residents, businesses, and solar installers. The guide provides information about PV technology, net metering, installation methods, permitting, and government incentives. Other cities throughout the country have adopted Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) programs to spur renewable energy projects. Under PACE programs, localities issue bonds to create a loan pool to help local property owners finance renewable energy and efficiency projects. Property owners repay their loans through assessments on their property taxes or other locally collected bills over the course of a decade or more. The idea of attaching the loan directly to the property is that the loan for the improvement stays with the party that will benefit from the improvement, rather than the property owner who might sell the property. By extending loan repayment over decades, the monthly savings from energy cost reductions are in closer proportion to the monthly repayment of the project's costs.

Read More...

Back Off From Our Housing Choices

Thursday, March 10th, 2011
By Edward Glaeser

In February the Obama Administration took two modest but welcome steps toward toward reducing federal subsidies for suburbia by proposing changes to the home mortgage interest deduction. But President Obama should go further, and make the case that the American dream is found as easily in a skyscraper as in a ranch house. He should even ask his libertarian opponents to join in a fight against paternalistic public programs that artificially subsidize suburban life. The administration's report "Reforming America's Housing Finance Market" argues that the public role in housing "does not mean our goal is for all Americans to be homeowners." Instead, it says, "Americans should have choices in housing that make sense," and, "This means rental options near good schools and jobs." The report wants to "responsibly reduce Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac's role in the market and ultimately wind down both institutions." While they exist, the report urges them to charge more for mortgage guarantees, as if they were "private banks or financial institutions."

Read More...

Beyond Fannie and Freddie, a New Approach

Tuesday, February 15th, 2011
By Edward Glaeser

The report on Friday on "Reforming America's Housing Finance Market" left me feeling downright giddy. While the report is hardly a finished plan for Freddie Mac (the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation) and Fannie Mae (the Federal National Mortgage Association), and going forward, countless opportunities will arise for everything to go awry, it is a very good start. The report clearly explains the role that these entities, known as government-sponsored enterprises, or G.S.E.'s, played during the housing crisis, and it sensibly maps out a future with less pro-homeownership nonsense and a more responsible public sector.

Read More...

Glaeser's Book Spurs Discussion on Cities

Tuesday, February 15th, 2011
By

Cities are actually the healthiest, greenest, and richest (in cultural and economic terms) places to live, argues Rappaport Institute Director Edward Glaeser in his new book, "Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier." Glaeser's analyses and policy recommendations - which include scaling programs that encourage suburbanization (such as the home mortgage interest deduction) and scaling back policies such as historic preservation that limit new development in cities - have been drawing significant media coverage since the book was released last week with reviews in such publications as The New York Times and The Economist, articles by Glaeser in The Atlantic and The Boston Globe Magazine; a New York Times column by David Brooks, and appearances on The Daily Show with John Stewart, NPR's Weekend Edition Saturday, and NPR's The Takeaway. More information about the book is available at: www.triumphofthecity.com. Click on "read more" for links to all the reviews.

Read More...

To Preserve and Protect: Land Use Regulations in Weston, Massachusetts

Friday, December 10th, 2010
By Alexander von Hoffman

This working paper is part of the research project, The Evolution of Residential Land Use Regulation in Greater Boston, carried out under the auspices of Harvard's Joint Center for Housing Studies and the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston. The goals of this project are to identify and understand the reasons that towns and cities in eastern Massachusetts have made Greater Boston a highly regulated urban region and to help devise residential planning policies that advance general, rather than parochial, interests, and what some call "Smart Growth." In particular, the project aims to discover precisely why and under what circumstances particular communities adopted residential land use regulations by studying the evolution of regulations in residential real estate development in four different Boston-area communities and in the legal interpretation of the state laws of Massachusetts.

Read More...

Lechmere Square Public Market: Preliminary Feasibility Study

Tuesday, November 30th, 2010
By Brandy H.M. Brooks

In the last year, a great deal of interest has arisen with regard to creating a year-round public market in Lechmere Square. Recognizing the enthusiasm from the East Cambridge community, this report examines different public market models and offers an assessment of Lechmere Square as a public market site. Public markets can be used to support a wide variety of community and economic development goals and are found in a broad range of forms and scales of operation, making them adaptable to communities and locations with vastly differing characteristics. This diversity and flexibility has fostered a renewed interest in public markets over the past few decades, as local governments, nonprofit organizations and private corporations all rediscover the benefits of this age-old commercial and cultural tradition. Even with the distinctive assortment of public markets across the country, there are still common themes of strong mission and solid management that are shared by successful markets. Good public markets develop a clear brand; representative and responsive governing structures; and a management team that smoothly handles the array of operational tasks to keep a market running, from vendor relations and publicity to deliveries and storage.

Read More...

Figure Out Your Solar Capacity, Courtesy of the Boston Redevelopment Authority

Monday, November 15th, 2010
By Theodore Kalivas

(Originally published in the Boston Green Blog, Dukakis Center for Urban & Regional Policy). While there has been a great deal of controversy surrounding the Cape Wind project, solar power has found itself in a less-embattled state, especially in the city of Boston. The city's "Solar Boston" initiative has begun work to increase the city's solar capacity, in the hopes of making Boston a more hospitable market for that type of renewable energy. The Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) and Boston Housing Authority (BHA) are working together to make rooftop solar more viable for low-income units. Already, the city's Maverick Landing, a HOPE VI redevelopment, employs solar arrays and other green building features. The City has committed to making sure that future housing developments include photovoltaic (PV) arrays on their rooftops. Through "net metering,"these units will produce solar electricity that not only powers the building they are attached to, but that also feeds power back into the grid for a profit to the PV owner.

Read More...

Did Credit Market Policies Cause the Housing Bubble?

Wednesday, May 5th, 2010
By Edward Glaeser

Many economists have argued that aspects of the credit market, including low interest rates, can explain the boom. The evidence summarized in this Policy Brief casts doubt on the view that easy credit can explain the bubble. It isn't that low interest rates don't boost housing prices. They do. It isn't that higher mortgage approval rates aren't associated with rising home values. They are. But the impact of these variables, as predicted by economic theory and as estimated empirically over many years, is too small to explain much of the housing market event that we have just experienced.

Read More...

The High Cost of Affordable Housing

Wednesday, May 7th, 2008
By

Is it getting too expensive to build affordable housing in Massachusetts? On average, it costs more than $200,000 a unit to build such housing and many projects cost significantly more. A new proposal in the state Senate would make those projects even more expensive. The Senate housing bill would require nonprofit entities and for-profit firms that build most of the region's affordable housing to pay construction workers the "prevailing wage," a legal term for whatever unionized workers get for doing the work. (Construction projects carried out by most public-sector entities have long been subject to this provision.)

Read More...

The Culture of Stressing Costs Over Safety

Sunday, July 16th, 2006
By

How could a project once touted as one of the 21st century's engineering marvels have such fatal and seemingly obvious problems? In coming weeks we'll learn more details about just what went wrong. But it's already clear that part of the problem was that for more than a decade public officials in charge of the Big Dig overemphasized concerns about the projects' costs and underemphasized the need to build a safe, well-built project.

Read More...

Regulation and the Rise in Housing Prices in Greater Boston

Thursday, January 5th, 2006
By Edward Glaeser

In well-functioning markets, when prices rise, supply increases, and then prices stop rising and sometimes even fall. By this defi nition, the housing market in the greater Boston area is not working.

Read More...

Learning from Ammann: Politics as a Design Problem

Thursday, July 1st, 2004
By

Many architects study Othmar Ammann, the well known engineer, because the bridges he designed which include the George Washington Bridge and the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge - are exemplars of economy, efficiency, and grace. Virtually no architect (or anyone else for that matter) studies Othmar Ammann, the political entrepreneur. In a feat unnoted in most architectural history books, Ammann designed and carried out a brilliant campaign to have the Port Authority of New York build the George Washington Bridge and to hire him to design it and oversee its construction. Ignoring this lesser known side of Ammann is a mistake, because he can teach usefull lessons to architects, who often mistakenly view policics as an irrational and immutable process that just gets in the way of good architecture.

Read More...

Dispelling the Myth of Home Rule: Local Power in Greater Boston

Tuesday, March 16th, 2004
By David Barron

Massachusetts is a strong home rule state, it is commonly believed. It is, people say, a state that gives its cities and towns a great deal of local autonomy. This view is so widely held that efforts to promote regionalism in the Boston metropolitan area are often dismissed as impossible. But is this view right? Over the last two years, we have investigated whether the 101 cities and towns within the Boston metropolitan region have "home rule" in the local autonomy sense of the term. To do so, we have examined the provisions of the state constitution that purport to give home rule to Massachusetts' local governments and the numerous state statutes that grant and limit local power. We have also interviewed officials from more than half of the cities and towns in the region to find out how home rule functions in practice. The results suggest that the standard story about home rule in Massachusetts is largely a myth.

Read More...

» Show all posts

Gov. Deval Patrick speaking at the Rappaport Center's Gubernatorial Speakers Series
Statnet panel of current and former heads of local performance management programs including Stephanie Hirsch (far right), former head of SomerStat and Devin Lyons-Quirk, third from right.
Former Lt. Governor Kerry Healey speaks about political parity at the Rappaport Center
U.S. Representative Barney Frank speaking at the Harvard Kennedy School, cosponsored by the Rappaport Institute.
HKS Professor Jeffrey Liebman (left) spoke about new ways to spur policy innovation at a State House briefing sponsored by State Representative (and former Rappaport Urban Scholar) Charles Murphy (right).
 MA Attorney General Martha Coakley Hearing on Sexual Exploitation Online
Triumph of the City: Ed Glaeser talks about his new book on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart
Arianna Huffington and Alan Khazei speaking at the Rappaport Center
Mayor Menino attends Marshall-Brennan Constitutional Literacy Course for high school students

News and Events


Add your Event

Word Cloud