Contributing Editors

Jerome Lyle Rappaport

Jerome Lyle Rappaport
Founder and Board Member
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Edward Glaeser

Edward Glaeser
Professor of Economics at Harvard University
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Stephen P. Johnson

Stephen P. Johnson
Executive Director of Phyllis and Jerome Lyle Rappaport Foundation
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Greg Massing

Greg Massing
Executive Director for the Rappaport Center for Law and Public Service
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Alasdair Roberts

Alasdair Roberts
Professor of Law and Public Policy at Suffolk University Law School
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Joseph Curtatone

Joseph Curtatone
Mayor, City of Somerville
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Tim H. Davis

Tim H. Davis
Independent Research Consultant
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Scott Harshbarger

Scott Harshbarger
Senior Counsel, Proskauer Rose LLP
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Vivien Li

Vivien Li
Executive Director of The Boston Harbor Association
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Guest contributors

Monika Bandyopadhyay
Suffolk University Law Student

David Barron
Harvard Law School and former Deputy Counsel for the Office of Legal Counsel in the US Department of Justice

Linda Bilmes
Senior lecturer in public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. Assistant Secretary of Commerce during the Clinton Administration.

Brandy H.M. Brooks
Director, Rudy Bruner Award for Urban Excellence, Bruner Foundation

Felicia Cote
Rappaport Fellow, Harvard Law School/Harvard Kennedy School.

Amanda Eden
Suffolk University Law School student

Sara Farnum
Student, Suffolk Univ. Law School

Kristin Faucette
Student at Suffolk University Law School

Benjamin Forman
Research Director, MassINC

Arthur Hardy-Doubleday
JD/MBA student at Suffolk University Law School and the Sawyer School of Business

Theodore Kalivas
Boston Green Blog, Dukakis Center for Urban & Regional Policy

David Linhart
Student, Boston University School of Law

Antoniya Owens
Research Analyst, Mathematica Policy Research, Inc.

Susan Prosnitz
Senior Advisor, TSA, Washington, DC

Ben Thomas
Boston Green Blog, Dukakis Center for Urban & Regional Policy

Matthew Todaro
Student at Boston College Law School

Alexander von Hoffman
Senior Researcher, Joint Center for Housing Studies

Brett Walker
Student, Boston College Law School

Margarita Warren
Student at Suffolk University Law School

Articles in Education

An Insider’s View of Higher Ed in Massachusetts

Monday, August 26th, 2013
By Bob Dion for the Author

2013 Rappaport Public Policy Fellow Chronicles His Summer at Mass DHE

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Historic Milestone

Saturday, January 5th, 2013
By Bob Dion for the Author

Stuart Temple to celebrate 13-year old building with bar mitzvah.

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The Impact of Rappaport Public Policy Fellows Program on Career Trajectories

Monday, November 7th, 2011
By Posted by Jannelle Cioffi for the Author

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Dismantling the Cradle to Prison Pipeline: Analyzing Zero Tolerance School Discipline Policies and Identifying Strategic Opportunities for Intervention

Tuesday, October 25th, 2011
By Posted by Jannelle Cioffi for the Author

Jennifer Vorse Wilka (MPP 2011, Harvard Kennedy School)

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Bargaining for Reform: Changing Course in Underperforming Schools

Friday, May 13th, 2011
By Monika Bandyopadhyay

The Massachusetts legislature recently passed a bill providing superintendents unprecedented flexibility to change teacher collective bargaining agreements (CBAs) in under-performing schools. The bill ushers in a new kind of collective bargaining that could be effective in closing a persistent achievement gap. Whether these changes will successfully address one of today’s most complex and urgent public policy challenges will turn on implementation.

Massachusetts is plagued by an achievement gap along racial and socioeconomic lines, even while on average Massachusetts’ students are among the highest performing in the United States and internationally. In 2009, just 35 percent of low-income students were proficient in English/Language Arts compared to 65 percent of whites and Asians; 15 percent of low-income students were proficient in math compared to about 50 percent of whites and Asians. Students at the losing end enter society ill prepared for higher education and skilled jobs.

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Glaeser's Book Spurs Discussion on Cities

Tuesday, February 15th, 2011
By

Cities are actually the healthiest, greenest, and richest (in cultural and economic terms) places to live, argues Rappaport Institute Director Edward Glaeser in his new book, "Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier." Glaeser's analyses and policy recommendations - which include scaling programs that encourage suburbanization (such as the home mortgage interest deduction) and scaling back policies such as historic preservation that limit new development in cities - have been drawing significant media coverage since the book was released last week with reviews in such publications as The New York Times and The Economist, articles by Glaeser in The Atlantic and The Boston Globe Magazine; a New York Times column by David Brooks, and appearances on The Daily Show with John Stewart, NPR's Weekend Edition Saturday, and NPR's The Takeaway. More information about the book is available at: www.triumphofthecity.com. Click on "read more" for links to all the reviews.

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Urban Charter Schools and Student Achievement

Monday, February 7th, 2011
By

Urban charter schools in Massachusetts have large positive effects on student achievement at both the middle and high school levels, according to a new study by researchers from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, MIT and the University of Michigan. Results for nonurban charter schools, however, were less clear with some analyses indicating positive effects on student achievement at the high school level, while results for middle school students were much less encouraging. The study, which was funded by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education through a grant from the U.S. Department of Education was done by a research team led by Joshua Angrist, Ford Professor of Economics at MIT and was published by the Center for Education Policy Research at Harvard.

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Anticipating Change in the Massachusetts Teacher Workforce

Friday, December 10th, 2010
By Antoniya Owens

Nationwide, baby boom teachers are beginning to retire in large numbers while student enrollment continues to rise. The trend is causing concern about impending shortages in many states. This article summarizes findings from a recent report evaluating future demand and supply dynamics in the Massachusetts teacher workforce. The report covers the academic years 2010-2011 through 2019-2020 and analyzes trends in the Commonwealth as a whole and in its 10 largest school districts.1 The approach may be of interest in other states. Methodology The report employs a teacher supply and demand model similar to that used by previous researchers.2 The model is applied separately to district data for the 10 largest districts and to state data for total Commonwealth estimates. It first projects annual total demand for teachers based on forecasts of student enrollment and assumptions about student-teacher ratios. Enrollment projections for the state come from the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.

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How Republicans Might Improve Education

Tuesday, December 7th, 2010
By Edward Glaeser

The Republican Party historically achieved electoral success by championing both limited government and national security, and they will have to do that again in 2012. During the 2010 election, the Republicans and their allies raised the powerful specter of national decline. I, too, worry about the future of a nation whose 15-year-olds scored in the bottom quarter of participating nations of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development in one major test of "mathematical literacy."

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In the Aftermath of Question 2: Students with Limited English Proficiency in Massachusetts

Tuesday, November 30th, 2010
By Antoniya Owens

In November 2002, Massachusetts voters approved Question 2, a ballot initiative to replace transitional bilingual education (TBE) with sheltered English immersion (SEI) an instructional model that teaches students with limited English proficiency all academic content in English. The mandate became fully effective in the fall of academic year 2003-04. Although its implementation has varied somewhat across the state, the majority of limited English-proficient students (LEP) in Massachusetts are now enrolled in SEI programs. Still, to date there has been no comprehensive statewide assessment of the effects of this policy change on students' engagement outcomes and academic performance.

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» Show all posts

HKS Professor Jeffrey Liebman (left) spoke about new ways to spur policy innovation at a State House briefing sponsored by State Representative (and former Rappaport Urban Scholar) Charles Murphy (right).
Gov. Deval Patrick speaking at the Rappaport Center's Gubernatorial Speakers Series
 MA Attorney General Martha Coakley Hearing on Sexual Exploitation Online
U.S. Representative Barney Frank speaking at the Harvard Kennedy School, cosponsored by the Rappaport Institute.
Arianna Huffington and Alan Khazei speaking at the Rappaport Center
Mayor Menino attends Marshall-Brennan Constitutional Literacy Course for high school students
Statnet panel of current and former heads of local performance management programs including Stephanie Hirsch (far right), former head of SomerStat and Devin Lyons-Quirk, third from right.
Former Lt. Governor Kerry Healey speaks about political parity at the Rappaport Center
Triumph of the City: Ed Glaeser talks about his new book on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart

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